Lucky Cardinal Pell – now not so lucky

Lucky Cardinal PellCardinal Pell Sentenced!

Today, 13/3/2018, Cardinal Pell received a maximum sentence of six years for the sexual abuse of two teenage boys, after Sunday mass at St Patrick’s Cathedral in 1966.  He will be eligible for parole in three years and eight months.

While handing down the sentence Chief Judge Peter Kidd said Pell been “breathtakingly arrogant” and “brazen and callous” in his offending.

That Australia’s most senior Catholic leader has been found guilty of child sexual assault astounds me.  No longer is the Catholic church successful at covering up its heinous deeds.

Pell will, of course, make an appeal.

Take care of Yourself and others

Australia media is inundated with this news of this case and undoubtedly survivors of child sexual abuse will be triggered. Some ideas for caring for yourself and others can be found here: Taking care of yourself (or a loved one) in the wake of George Pell’s conviction

Survivors and Solicitors 

Pell is now guilty and imprisoned. It’s likely that others who have been sexually abused as children, and who have remained silent, may now be considering legal action against their perpetrators.  Before you embark on a marathon legal journey, read Survivors and Solicitors, and make sure you have a strong team with you.

Original Post 8 May 2018.

Cardinal George Pell, Australia’s most senior Catholic leader, was committed to stand trial for historic child sexual offences last week.  He is currently on leave from his role as treasurer of the Vatican and the Holy See. The Holy See is the central governing body of the entire Roman Catholic Church and operates from within the Vatican City. The Vatican City is an independent state located on Vatican Hill in Rome.  This high-ranking position puts Cardinal Pell third in charge after the Pope – that’s a position that wields a lot of power and controls a lot of money.

After two months of deliberation, Magistrate Belinda Wallington ruled, on 1 May 2018, that Continue reading

Enraged psychologists fighting for an improved mental health system

Enraged psychologistI’ve never met so many enraged psychologists as I have in the last six months. We’re channelling our pent up fury by pounding keyboards, our battle cry is echoing loudly through social media and Members of Parliament (MP’s) are being accosted at every opportunity.

And that goes against everything I know about my usually sedate and contemplative colleagues.

Life of an enraged Psychologist 

Let me tell you a bit about the life of a psychologist. We work with vulnerable people in our community. You can find us in hospitals, schools, unemployment services, domestic violence agencies, substance abuse services, disability services, prisons, rehabilitation clinics, the armed forces, the police service and in private practice. We work with kids and adults.

Most of our days are spent being cool, calm and collected… and teaching others to do the same.

We are a female workforce, 80% of psychologists are female.   I have worked with very few male psychologists. Possibly men don’t join us because it’s a low paid, caring role and we need to change that. You’ll often find a disproportionate number of male psychologists in management, board and director roles. The mental health system is dominated by male psychiatrists. Yes, psychology is low paid. Many psychologists work part-time, juggling family care.

We spend hours exploring trauma, often perpetrated by the hands of others, that has led to the clients’ mental health problems. We sit beside those in debilitating emotional and physical pain. We hold space for gut-wrenching grief. We teach, support, advocate and listen.  It’s exhausting work.

We often don’t have much energy or patience left at the end of the day, but we go home and tend to our families. We are not usually enraged psychologists.

Blindsided Psychologists – Is this a feminist issue?

To our detriment, as female psychologists, we have been so focused on supporting our clients (and our families), that we have allowed our profession to be blindsided, and this has ultimately been detrimental to our clients. Most psychologists (and our clients), not just those who work in private practice, will continue to be disadvantaged unless the Medicare Benefits Schedule Taskforce Review into Mental Health currently underway makes significant changes. (If you are a psychologist who doesn’t work in private practice and you think this has no impact on you… keep reading!)

In 2006, in the dark ages, before we had harnessed the power of social media to build a collective of enraged psychologists, Medicare instigated a two-tier system to assist Australians to access psychological treatment.

I vaguely remember this happening, but I wasn’t working in private practice then, so didn’t pay much attention. I should have!  Behind this two-tier system is a story worthy of a tv drama of political intrigue and deceit. It includes powerful and stealthful lobbying by one group of psychologists and academics, unnoticed by another preoccupied group of psychologists who were focused on their clients (and family) and placed their faith, and money, in the Australian Psychological Society (APS) who vowed to represent them. In my opinion, the APS ruthlessly betrayed the majority of psychologists and the Australian public by failing to advocate for the bulk of their members and failing to advise on an appropriate mental health process for Australians.

The drama also includes the pervasive culture of fear that has been instilled in psychologists, through threats of retribution and ostracism if you are do not hold membership with the APS.  Fearful psychologists question “If I advocate for change will I be audited?”,  “Will I be blacklisted?”

I say viva la revolution!

Why are psychologists enraged? Meet the discriminatory Medicare two-tier system!

The Medicare two tiers are this.

  1. One tier provides access to Clinical Psychologists who are permitted to provide the evidence-based therapy which is best for the client. Clients receive a rebate of $124.50.
  2. The other tier provides access to Psychologists who are only permitted to provide Psychologically Focussed Therapy. This is a limited choice of therapies and may not be the best therapy for the client. Clients receive a rebate of $84.80.

Psychology sessions under the Medicare two-tier system are not free to clients!

Let us do away with that fallacy. Most psychologists can’t sustain a living by bulk billing clients. We have to charge a gap fee.  In general, psychologists providing Medicare services are self-employed, even if we work in a group practice. We must pay for room rental, insurance, professional development, and administration. We do not get paid holiday or sick leave. We are meant to finance our own superannuation, but many don’t make enough to do so. There is no fee for letters to doctors, the phone calls we make and the preparation that takes place before we see clients.  If a client doesn’t turn up, we often don’t get paid.

The Medicare two-tier system misleads clients!

Clients assume that the higher rebate for a clinical psychologist ensures they receive superior therapeutic treatment from a psychologist who is more skilled and experienced than those who are not eligible for the higher rebate.  This is false.

Consider a client with Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a result of child sexual abuse who requires psychological treatment.  Currently, the treatment options for a client through Medicare may hypothetically be:

  1. A clinical psychologist, with a Masters in Clinical Psychology, with two years’ experience whose previous employment was in a hospital renal ward.  This psychologist is at the start of their career and their professional development has been in pain management and weight loss strategies.
  2. A psychologist, with a Masters in Applied Psychology (Counselling), with 10 years’ experience working with trauma victims in domestic violence and sexual assault services. This psychologist has invested years of professional development in treating child sexual abuse.
  3. A psychologist who completed 4 + 2 pathway (four-year degree + two years’ probation completing a competency-based program under supervision) with 20 years’ experience in sexual assault services, a drug and alcohol community organisation and private practice. This psychologist has invested in years of professional development from leading trauma experts.

Under the current Medicare two-tier system, the clinical psychologist (A) can offer a broad range of therapeutic interventions.  However, psychologists B and C, while trained and experienced in the delivery of appropriate therapeutic interventions are limited to only providing Focussed Psychological Strategies while working under Medicare.  Although, they can provide alternative and more appropriate services to private clients.  Therefore, the two-tier Medicare system limits the client’s access to the most appropriate therapeutic intervention and their ability to choose the most experienced psychologist that would best meet their needs.

The situation becomes even more complex when a client needs to access a service where there is only one (non-clinical) psychologist available, such as in a remote area (most clinical psychologists are found in cities).  That psychologist is then limited, unethically and without evidence, by the Medicare rebate system, to the type of therapy they can provide the client. And, psychologists with clinical endorsement only make up 40% of the psychology workforce.

While I have proposed a hypothetical situation, it reflects my real-life experience of working within psychological services alongside clinical psychologists.  We all do the same work.  I have taken over caseloads when psychologists have resigned, with and without clinical endorsement, and there is no discernible difference between client complexity or treatment plans. All registered psychologists are trained in and can diagnose, assess and treat clients, regardless of whether they are clinically endorsed or not. The example provided demonstrates that depth and breadth of psychological expertise is developed post-university.

This great video by One Psychology  Australia explains it even better.

All psychologists do great work with their clients.

Psychologists working in both Medicare tiers obtain great outcomes with their clients.  There is no outcome difference between psychologists with or without clinical endorsement. Behind the closed doors of the counselling room, we all do the same work.  We all provide the therapeutic treatment that is the best for the client. To not do so, despite the Medicare restrictions, would be unethical.  See Research into Outcomes in Psychology Practice Under Medicare Better Access.

The Medicare two-tier system perpetuates a false hierarchy

The Medicare two-tier rebate system has imposed a false hierarchy within the profession of psychology which is now negatively impacting psychologists’ roles in systems outside of Medicare such as hospitals, schools, Centrelink and the NDIS.  A clinical psychologist is now, falsely, seen to represent a psychologist with more expertise than that of other psychologists. Psychologists, who do not have a clinical endorsement, have been stopped from providing assessments and reports in these systems, despite years of experience and appropriate expertise.  Imagine what its like if you are a parent of a child with autism, who has been diagnosed and treated by a psychologist, with years of experience and training in the field,… but their report is rejected.  However, a newly qualified psychologist with a clinical endorsement, with limited experience, can sign the report. No wonder we are enraged psychologists!

Private practices are recruiting clinical psychologists over other, possibly more experienced and qualified psychologists, simply because they attract a greater Medicare rebate and therefore higher fees can be charged.

In popular usage, the term clinical psychologist refers to a psychologist who works in a clinic. The term is often misunderstood by community members and those that work in the health profession.

The term clinical psychologist represents an area of endorsement with the Australian Health Practitioner Agency (APHRA).  There is an increased number of jobs advertising for clinical psychologists, despite there being other psychologists (who may hold other endorsements with APHRA) who would meet the skills and experience required for the position.

The Medicare two-tier system limits client access to a competent and diverse range of psychologists.

The consequences of this false hierarchy, which is seeping through the profession, is that there are now fewer university courses in Applied, Counselling, Health, Organisational, Education and Developmental psychology.  This narrowing of the psychological field is not a benefit to the mental health and wellbeing of our community. The continuation of the Medicare two-tier model would further support and promote this false hierarchy.

I am a psychologist in a busy Brisbane inner-city practice and our administration team now consists of four psychology students.  They have all discussed the pressure they are under to complete a Masters of Clinical Psychology, despite valuing the diversity of our team, and preferring to take an alternative pathway to become a Psychologist.  They worry that if they do not take the clinical psychology pathway their future employment opportunities will be limited.  They contemplate leaving the profession before they have even entered it.

One Tier – One Rebate

The MBS Taskforce Review into Mental Health initial draft document for public consultation has now been released. The report recommends some improvements including much needed additional sessions for clients with the greatest need, being able to see parents without the child being present and more flexibility to deliver group program.  Unfortunately, the two-tier model remains!

We need One tier – One rebate.  This system will allow the client to access the therapy they need from the most appropriate psychologist… or mental health social worker, or mental health occupational therapist.

Psychologists, let’s continue the rage!

Psychologists maintain the rage!  Speak boldly with your enraged voice, the public debate is urgently required. Do not listen to those that label you a trouble maker, be the instigators of change. Do not be “good” and quiet girls, be strong and powerful women.
We must take time out from client and family care, and stand up for ourselves, and for our clients. We need to become political beasts, meeting with MP’s, writing missives of rebellion to the Australian Psychological Society (who originally proposed an even worse three-tier system to the Taskforce Review see my earlier response to that here!) and joining the Australian Association of Psychologists and Reform APS who provide an alternative viewpoint to the Australian Psychological Society. The profession of psychology cannot be united unless the injustices are addressed.

Keep up the activism, so we have significant input into the final report of the MBS Taskforce Review into Mental Health.

We need consumers and providers of the Australian mental health services to understand the ramifications of maintaining the Medicare two-tier system and act to change it.

One tier – one rebate.

Enraged Psychologists, you can take action.

Mental health advocates and consumers, you can take action

Live like a giraffe in 2019

Giraffes Crescent IslandMy new year started on safari in Kenya. One of the many amazing highlights of this trip was walking with the giraffes on Crescent Island, Lake Naivasha. It was like wandering through the Garden of Eden and it was easy to imagine the birth of humanity here.

Watching the gentle and majestic giraffes inspired my new year wishes.

How to live like a giraffe.Giraffes Crescent Island

Walk with dignity, purpose and pride.

Hold your head high and look beyond the petty irritations of life.

Remain calm under all circumstances.

Stay connected and protected by your family and friends.

Happy new year to you all.

Building connection and intimacy through Mindful Coupling

Mindful coupling cardsAs a couple’s therapist, I’m always on the lookout for new ways to build connection and intimacy with couples.  I was delighted when I discovered an ex colleague of mine, psychologist Iris Goemans, had created Mindful Coupling.  This innovative tool for couples is like a delicious box of chocolates, full of unexpected delights.  I asked Iris to tell me more about Mindful Coupling…

 What is Mindful Coupling?

Mindful Coupling is a relationship card set designed to help couples reconnect, reawaken and rejuvenate their relationship.  It includes 30 powerful weekly actions and 64 intimacy-building questions to strengthen a couple’s bond, deepen their connection and enhance intimacy. 

What inspired you to create Mindful Coupling?

Love is one of the most profound emotions known to human beings. Romantic relationships can provide a deep source of fulfilment and can be a very meaningful part of our lives.  However when I looked around me, I noticed very few relationships that were actually doing well.  I noticed many couples feeling dissatisfied in their relationship and disconnected from each other, and that this was causing a lot of anguish. As a wife and mother myself, I understood that feeling disconnected can easily happen, especially when you’re running a household, looking after children, maintaining jobs, and generally trying to keep on top of all the other things life throws at us.  People tend to think that the grass is greener on the other side, but it’s actually greenest where you water it.  Continue reading

Survivors and Solicitors

Survivors of child sexual abuse, who courageously gave evidence to The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, are now torn between applying for compensation through the Redress Scheme and/or launching legal proceedings against the perpetrating organisations. Neither pathway is easy and neither has a guaranteed outcome. Historical child sexual abuse cases are notoriously difficult to win given the passage of time, lack of witnesses and the legal requirement for detailed information.  Survivors and solicitors embarking on the marathon journey into the world of trauma and legal processes need to be well prepared.

Acknowledge the legal process will trigger trauma symptoms

Female survivor alone

Applying to the Redress Scheme or undertaking legal action is likely to be distressing. Revisiting the abuse, providing statements, and arguing your case may trigger flashbacks, nightmares and other trauma symptoms.  During this time be proactive in care for yourself.

Gather a support team

  • Invite someone, other than the solicitor, to join you on the journey and be your support person.  Ask them to accompany you to appointments, read information, discuss the case with you and retain the focus in appointments when you are distressed.  Give consideration to who you would ask. Another trauma survivor may also be triggered by the process.  Perhaps there could be more than one person to assist you.
  • Inform your family and friends that the legal process is likely to be stressful and lengthy. Try and be clear about what you need e.g. “After appointments, I may be distressed, can you spend some time with me?”  “Can you come for a walk sometimes to help me manage the stress?”  “I may just need a hug or my handheld, will you be able to do that for me?”
  • Access support through a psychologist, counsellor, social worker,  or caseworker and schedule regular appointments in advance.

Commit to a rigorous self-care plan

Legal cases may go on for years and are stressful. They are indeed a marathon and not a sprint. Continue reading

60 years of loving

How has life, and the way we date, changed since Rhonda and Arthur met and married?  This couple, my inspiring parents-in-law, Stevens loving Mum and Dad, and wonderful grandparents to my children married on 1 October 1955, 63 years ago.  They have enjoyed over 60 years of loving.

The first date

P1080380 (2)They met on a blind date.  For those of you that don’t know what that is, it’s where friends set up a date for you with someone you don’t know.  Kind of similar to Tinder except you didn’t get to stalk their Facebook page to see what they looked like.

Rhonda and Arthur courted.  The definition of courting for their time would have been “be involved with (someone) romantically, with the intention of marrying”.  The urban dictionary today gives the definition as “traditionally courting would include no sexual activity but today that is not usually followed”. I didn’t ask them which definition they followed, and I don’t ask my kids which kind of courting they do either.

No mobile phones

Sixty three years ago Continue reading

Celebrate Stepfathers on Fathers Day

Stefather and child at beach
Photo by Derek Thomson on Unsplash

Let’s take time out to acknowledge and celebrate stepfathers on Fathers Day.  Over 20% of  Australian children live in step or blended families, therefore, thousands of men are stepping into an ambiguous and difficult role.

Those passionate and delightful “in love” feelings couples experience in a new relationship don’t necessarily encompass your new partner’s children. And kids don’t Continue reading

Why reduce access to 100 years of psychological expertise? Reject the APS Submission to the Medicare Review.

Australian’s requiring psychological treatment will have less access to psychologists if the Australian Psychological Society’s (APS) submission to the Medicare Benefits Schedule Review is accepted.

Our Practice

I am a generalist psychologist in a busy inner-city practice. Our professional team consists of five generalist psychologists, a mental health occupational therapist, a music therapist and a therapy dog.

Our admin team consists of two psychology students and a mental health nurse.

Together we have about 100 years of psychological expertise, hard earned in a range of settings including domestic violence services, sexual assault services, child-focused treatment centres, mental health institutions, relationship services, unemployment services and crisis lines.

Group supervision
Our team participating in group supervision

Collectively we have completed about 40 years of academic studies Continue reading

Redress: the setting right of that which is morally wrong

Woman, hands to face, in despair
Photo by Kat Jayne from Pexels

Through the Redress Scheme, those who have been sexually abused in Australian institutions now have the opportunity to obtain financial compensation, counselling and a personal apology for the horror they endured. But don’t for one minute think it will be an easy process.

On 14 September 2015 the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse released its Redress and Civil Litigation Report. After receiving submissions from more than 250 individuals and institutions, the 589-page report made 99 recommendations. There was an enormous financial cost to the Australian public for the Royal Commission so we should listen to what the Royal Commission had to say.

Here are some of the most significant recommendations regarding the Redress Scheme and what’s happened so far: Continue reading

The international wedding – from New York to Cairns and back again

Sign - Chelsea & Sean, June 16 2018
Chelsea & Sean, June 16 2018

I love attending a wedding, as I wrote in Wedding Rings and Canoe Paddles. As a psychologist, my days are often filled with the sadness and problems of life so it’s joyous to take time out to witness the joining of families, friends, communities, and in this case countries. There seems to be so little opportunity to come together with old friends and family, separated as we often are by geography and busyness. A wedding is a wonderful chance to pause and celebrate the expression of love, to honour a shared history, to laugh, to cry and to reflect on the odd things that happen.  This international wedding was no exception.

The Bride and Groom, Chelsea and Sean, live in New York, the bridesmaids in Brisbane, New York, Dubai and Cairns, the groomsmen in New York and Dubai, the Mother of the Groom in Florida the Mother of the Bride in Los Angeles and the Father of the Bride in Cairns. The guests were predominantly from Australia and the USA. That’s a lot of coming together. We attended the Cairns wedding and there was a second wedding in New York.

This is a couple who don’t live where either of them grew up, where either of them went to university, where either of them started work or near any family.  They have worked hard to form and maintain friendships and family relationships across the world.  This wedding celebrated and strengthened these connections.

So what traditions did this international couple keep, or make their own? Continue reading